Xiaomi caught promoting Poco F1 with fake camera sample

Xiaomi Poco F1 Mi Mix 2S
Image Credit: Reddit

Huawei and Samsung recently faced a ton of criticism for pretending that the DSLR shots and stock photos used in their ads were camera samples from their phones. Xiaomi has now gotten caught up in a similar controversy of its own.

The incident began when Xiaomi Global spokesperson and Director of Product Management Donovan Sung posted an image of himself to his Instagram account. He claims the snap was taken with the new Poco F1. However, a sharp-eyed Reddit user noticed something amiss.

Xiaomi Poco F1 Photo Swap

It seems Sung had used the same photo to promote the Mi Mix 2S just a couple of months ago. The one on the left clearly has the ‘Shot on Mi MIX 2S, AI Dual Camera’ watermark. Shift your eyes to the same spot in the next photo and you’ll see a very poorly photoshopped cover-up.

This isn’t as bad as Samsung or Huawei straight-up using professional photographs since Xiaomi did use its own image at the end of the day. However, there’s always the possibility that the original shot was taken with a DSLR or the blur effect was manually added later.

Also Read: Xiaomi Redmi 6 series coming to India on September 5

Sung has predictably deleted the photo from his Instagram account. Neither him nor Xiaomi has made any comment on the matter. It should be pointed out that the Mi Mix 2S has a 12MP f/1.8 + 12MP f/2.4 setup, while the Poco F1 has a 12MP f/1.9 + 5MP f/2.0 one.

There’s clearly a big difference and it’s deceitful of Xiaomi to pretend like both can offer the same camera experience. The firm’s Poco F1 recently fell into a different sort of controversy when it was discovered that the device doesn’t allow HD video streaming.

Android Pure reports that the Poco F1 doesn’t support Widevine L1 DRM. The standard is required to play 720p and above videos. This strange exclusion means that platforms like Netflix and Amazon Prime can’t play HD content.

It’s not clear why Xiaomi didn’t include such a basic feature into the Poco F1. Even if it was to keep costs low, the least it could have done is inform consumers before they buy a handset that can’t keep up with their multimedia needs.