Sony to launch $100 Million HDNA Campaign to promote High Definition Products

Sony logo On August 17, Sony announced its plans to launch a $100 million marketing campaign to promote High-Definition TVs as well as related products. This initiative on the part of Sony Corp’s US electronics unit has been done in an effort to spur interest in its big-screen HDTVs.

According to Sony, the $100 million will be spent over the next six to eight months. Sony also stated that the campaign happens to be the company’s largest. Besides, the campaign also comes at an appropriate time as retail chains and consumers begin to plan for the holiday shopping season of 2007.

The marketing campaign will carry the slogan “HDNA”, and will even feature commercials with Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peton manning and NASCAR driver Dale Earnhardt Jr.

Interestingly, Sony had previously focused its marketing on individual products, but the “HDNA” campaign will adopt a different approach altogether.

“This is going to be all devices united under Sony. All of the products ware going to be delivered in a unified approach,” said Sony Electronics’ Chief Marketing Officer Mike Fasulo.

Sony also said that the HDNA campaign will promote everything from high-definition sets to Blu-ray players to camcorders and laptops that offer HD features.

“HDNA is the core, the essence of all Sony HD products. HDNA ensures an HD experience that you cannot have with any other brand,” Fasulo added.

“If a consumer is considering the purchase of an HD product, we believe that given our lineage and expertise in the category, Sony should be the only consideration. With this comprehensive campaign we will also demystify all of the fears associated with purchasing a high-def product,” assured Fasulo.

Sony’s HDNA marketing campaign will begin in September 2007. Besides print advertisements, the company will also extend its marketing efforts online as well as on TV.

It’s really great that Sony is going all out to “demystify” all of the public’s fears associated with the purchase of an HD product. It’s true that a lot of people are terribly confused about this new technology.

In fact, even Sony’s Mike Fasulo admitted that growth of the HD revolution may have been limited solely due to the conclusion over the different types of HD products and whether their homes receive high-resolution video or not.