Razer Abyssus Mouse Review: A Bare Bone Gaming Mouse High on Performance

Razer Abyssus

Over the past few years, we’ve known Razer’s obsession of christening products with very interesting names. Whether it’s the Imperator mouse that we recently reviewed or the Lycosa keyboard, the titles are alluring for sure. Well, one more such amusingly entitled mouse was on our desks waiting to be reviewed. The simple Razer Abyssus mouse kept us engaged in fun games round the day with its exciting functions.

There was just one thing that popped in our mind when we read Abyssus on the box meaning hell in Latin. It was Winston Churchill’s quote that reads, ‘If you are going through hell, keep going.’ And how we were geared up to keep going with this appealingly packed mouse? The pointing device came in a box that was simple both on the inside and outside. With just the mouse in question bundled, the exterior of the box displayed the mouse’s comprehensive feature list. It included a 3500dpi Razer precision 3.5G infrared sensor, 3 buttons for responsive feedback and hardware toggles to tweak the dpi and polling rate.

Showing off a smooth matte finishing with the glowing blue Razer logo in the center, the upper part of the mouse has a rubber texturized feel. The top surface though too smooth ensures the users’ grip is intact. The lower part of the mouse sports a glossy plastic chassis that actually blends neatly with the top matte finishing. We couldn’t stop ourselves from screaming ‘Wow!’ when we first handled the mouse. It was soft and comfortable and literally as smooth as silk. Flip the mouse over and the words Razer Abyssus along with the logo welcome you. The mouse can be configured to suit your needs courtesy the sensitivity and polling rate settings at the back.

Its straight forward fabrication makes the mouse even more exciting. The usual three mouse buttons namely left click, right click and a central scroll wheel/ universal scrolling featured on top of this mouse. Its zero-acoustic Ultraslick Teflon feet enabled us to navigate comfortably irrespective of the surface. On a good mousepad, the mouse actually just slides through with ease. We were rather enthused to find the mouse to be a simple plug-and-play device. Without any complicated settings commonly observed in gaming mice, indeed it brought us ‘back to the basics’. Just plug it into the computer or a laptop’s USB port and you are ready to go. The no-nonsense optical mouse enabled us to go straight to a game without having to worry about a lot of things.

The device fits perfectly in the palm and is designed to suit the needs of simple gamers. A little heavier than a standard mouse, it’s much lighter though than most gaming mice of its kind. Its overall form factor also was just right, not too big for regular use and not too small for gaming requirements. Moreover, the visual beings that we are, the device is more than pleasing to the eyes. Appearing like a strip-down version of an advanced gaming mouse, the company has left out extra buttons and fancy quick macro knobs for reasons best known to them.

Razer Abyssus Mouse

The much longer left and right click buttons nevertheless added to the gaming experience. We were assured great response irrespective of whether we used the palm grip or the claw grip. The mouse’s sensitivity too is on par with mice in the more advanced group. The Mechanical DPI switch on the right when it is turned over lets you control the speed at which the mouse takes its steps. It can be set at 450dpi, 1800dpi or 3500dpi. The polling rate can be switched between 125Hz and 1000Hz. For regular navigation, a 125Hz with 450dpi configuration seemed optimal.

We obviously couldn’t wait to try this one in our regular Counter Strike sessions. At the unprecedented 3500dpi, the Razer Precision 3.5G infrared sensor kept us more than happy gunning down Counter Terrorists. Yes, we played Terrorists to the hilt with the precise tracking and aiming capabilities of this one. We must say the accuracy of the mouse with shooter games, particularly first person shooters like Counter Strike is too good to be true even minus the driver software installed.

Installing the Razer Abyssus driver software v1.00 further enabled us exploit the complete capabilities of the mouse. The tool revealed three main tabs, Sensitivity, Scroll Wheel and Buttons. A fourth update tab took us straight to the Razer support website. We started playing around the sensitivity first that could be altered between 1 and 10. We could also opt to keep the on-the-fly sensitivity button on or off while choosing the speed of the double click. Next, the scroll wheel speed was what we chose to tweak. We could variate it to be as fast as one page per tick. You can even set the Universal scrolling on or off as desired. Finally the Buttons tab invited us to a bevy of attributes. By choosing our mouse orientation to be left-handed or right-handed, the software let us assign functions to the buttons. After assigning double click to the right button, scroll on the left button and click on the scroll wheel for a right-handed orientation, the mouse seemed to work just as efficiently as with its default settings.

Pros:

What we liked very much is the smoothness the mouse offers while navigating.

The pointing device’s curve is also just right and suits the palm grip really well.

Fashioned for simple point and click functions, the mouse is very good for shooter games.

Each click of the mouse was registered accurately and even after long play hours, the sensor seemed just as responsive.

Cons:

Changes in the settings are restricted to just the current machine. For those who would want to switch the mouse between the desktop and laptop or netbook, it will be a hassle for sure.

The glossy surface does attract its fair share of fingerprints and smudges.

Also we would have liked the manual switches to be at the side of the device instead of the bottom.

For those who keep performance over wider options and functions high up on their list, the mouse is an ideal choice. Its certainly fashioned for the niche crowd who even like their basic mice to be a notch above the rest. Appearing to be great value for money, the high-quality mouse offers virtually everything an advanced mouse would. We’d give the mouse 7.5 out of 10.

Our Shout

The mouse carries an affordable price tag of $49.99.