Motorola launches Moto Maxx with huge battery and beastly specs

We had received a whiff of its arrival some days ago, and Motorola has now officially unveiled its new Moto Maxx smartphone to the world. As you may know, this device is nothing but a rebranded version of the Verizon Droid Turbo, which means it’s the same awfully strong powerhouse that the said device happens to be.

This phone however, has only been announced for a Latin American release so far, so folks in Asia, Europe and other territories will definitely be disappointed. The Moto Maxx will hit Brazil today, while its release in Mexico will take place in the mid of November. It will then make its way into other Latin American countries.

Moto Maxx

For those unaware, this handset boasts of two-day battery life thanks to its 3900mAh power pack which can moreover, be recharged with up to 8 hours of juice in just 15 minutes. The Moto Maxx’s other highlights include its display which is 5.2 inches in size, is of the Super AMOLED type and bears a QHD resolution of 1440 x 2560 pixels (565ppi).

Also Read: Verizon’s new Droid Turbo from Motorola is the exact powerhouse it was rumored to be

A quad core Snapdragon 805 processor fuels its operations, taking assistance from 3GB worth of RAM. Its rear camera is a 21MP unit which features 4K video capabilities. There’s a 2MP front snapper present on it as well. Equipped with Android 4.4 KitKat, it has the same software features as the ones on the Moto X (2014).

Here’s a good look at the specs of the Moto Maxx:

– Display: 5.2-inch Super AMOLED, 1440 x 2560 pixels
– Processor: 2.7GHz quad core Snapdragon 805
– GPU: Adreno 420
– OS: Android 4.4 KitKat (upgradable to Lollipop)
– Memory: 3GB RAM, 32GB/64GB storage options
– Camera: 21MP rear, 2MP front
– Battery: 3900mAh
– Dimensions: 143.5mm x 73.3mm x 7.8mm
– Connectivity: 4G LTE (GSM), Bluetooth 4.0, Wi-Fi 802.11 (a/g/b/n/ac), NFC, microUSB

Moto Maxx

Motorola may not have plans of bringing the Moto Maxx to any countries other than Latin American ones right now, but that could very well change in the future, so it won’t hurt to stay optimistic.