Apple’s controversial throttling tool hits iPhone X, iPhone 8 in iOS 12.1

iPhone X Games

iOS 12.1 began rolling out recently with a bag full of improvements for everyone from the iPhone 5S to the iPhone XS. However, Apple has quietly included something for iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X owners – its infamous performance throttling feature.

Officially referred to as “performance management,” the tool was thought to be necessary only for older models. Apple released it earlier this year when it was discovered that an iOS update was making iPhones with degraded batteries slower. Customers weren’t aware this was happening and demanded to know more about their battery’s health.

Apple iPhone Battery Health

Apple added a Battery Health section to appease them in a later iOS update. It contains a section which tells the user what their maximum capacity is at the moment (100%, 90%, 80%) and Peak Performance Capability. If everything is fine, it’ll say the battery is supporting peak performance.

If the iPhone’s battery experiences an unexpected shutdown, performance management gets applied to stop this from happening again. This will result in a general slowdown, including longer app times and lower speaker volume. At this point, the user has two options.

They can either disable Apple’s protections and restore full functionality or get a new battery to do the same. Up until now, the company’s support page for the topic said that the iPhone 8 and later utilize an “advanced hardware and software design” which means that they don’t need to implement the same performance management feature as the rest.

Also See: Apple, Samsung fined millions for slowing down phones

As reported by The Verge, the page has now changed to accommodate the iOS 12.1 build. Starting with the software version, the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X will get the same performance management tool as the iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, iPhone SE, iPhone 7, and iPhone 7 Plus.

Apple tries to downplay the situation by assuring consumers that performance management might be less noticeable because of the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X’s “advanced hardware and software design.” It’s similar to the language used earlier, but now it’s made more clear that the trio could be at the end of the same throttling as the rest.

It’s a bit misleading for Apple to say one thing and then change its mind later. People who bought the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, or iPhone X might have been reassured that their device won’t go through the same slowdown problems. Now they’re in the same boat as everyone else.