LinkedIn gets two-step authentication via SMS

LinkedIn Two-Step Verification

LinkedIn has introduced two-step authentication through SMS for all those who think user account security could do with a shot in the arm. This move means it has joined the likes of Facebook, Google, Twitter, Outlook and others who’ve added the extra security factor for obvious reasons. But should it have come sooner since the networking site for professionals had a problem with hackers almost a year ago? Better late, we guess.

Back at that time, the company tried to soothe anxious members with tips instructing them to change passwords every three months at least and to make complex passwords containing special characters, numbers and a mix of uppercase as well as lowercase letters. This was in the face of reports about 6.5 million passwords having been stolen. The latest addition of two-factor authentication should perhaps work better towards alleviating worries about user information getting compromised.

Step 2

The security system functions by asking members to provide the code received on the registered mobile number they’ve submitted to LinkedIn when they log in through a device not recognized by the service. This can be done through four simple steps (image guide posted in order) we’re about to outline:

– The first thing to do is navigate to the last icon on the top right side. Here, click on Privacy & Settings which appears in the drop-down menu under Account & Settings.

Users will be directed to the page hosting a brief overview of their profile along with the chance to change their password. Situated below this are the options for fine-tuning Groups, Companies & Applications, Profile, Communications and Account settings.

Step 3

– Refer to Account for the next move. Hitting it will open up numerous choices including the Manage security settings and clicking on this option brings up Secure connection and Two-step verification.

– The last mentioned is set on Off by default and needs to be turned on, of course.

– Once this is done, users will be directed to a page containing their country and a blank section into which the concerned phone number must be typed in. It couldn’t get simpler than that.

In our opinion, the site could go users one better and make access to this process more visible.

Step 4

It’d be good to note that carrier charges may apply to this service. Additionally, the phone number provided by users as part of the LinkedIn two-step authentication drill will not be displayed on their profile.