HandTalk: A Glove that speaks for the Deaf

HandTalk Technology has always been of great help to the disabled and given them a helping hand to allow them to live a normal and healthy life like others. Inventors from Carnegie Mellon University have come up with a novel idea of a glove named Handtalk that will convert hand movements into text and allow the deaf to express themselves better.

The Handtalk glove needs to be worn on the hand by the deaf or mute person and depending on the variation of movement, the device will convert it intelligently into text and display it on a mobile phone for the other person to comprehend it easily. The Vibrating Braille mobile lets the blind express themselves using technology, now it’s the turn of the deaf and the mute.

The Handtalk glove senses the movements through the flexor pads which detect the different patterns of motion and the way the finger curls. The device can sense carefully each resistance and each movement made by the hand. Currently the device can convert only 32 words, but depending on the success of this device few more additional words may be added later onto this expressive system.

The Handtalk glove will be ideal to those who cannot interpret American Sign Language and their mobile phone would do a great job of communicating. Three of the four team members, senior computer engineering students Bhargav Bhat, Hemant Sikaria and Jorge L. Meza , demonstrated the prototype yesterday at Carnegie Mellon’s “Meeting of the Minds” expo of undergraduate research projects.

“That could be a big advantage” for hearing-impaired people, Mr. Bhat said. “It would cut out the need for an interpreter.”

The device works in a very interesting way. When it is first held in the fist it greets ‘Good Morning’ and when one extends the index finger, second finger and thumb, the device responds ‘I’m having a good time’ and hold out the index finger, little finger and thumb, The Handtalk glove will courteously respond as ‘Thank you for your time’. The inventors of this device give us a strong hope that this polite and humble invention can reach the hands of the needy as soon as possible.