Dutch police train eagles to capture drones, meanwhile in India…

Eagle Catching Drone

The very idea of a drone in the wrong hands makes everyone uncomfortable. But these flying marvels can also be used for so many crucial tasks like search and rescue, inspection of wobbly structures deemed unsafe for individuals to walk into, traffic monitoring, fire fighting, maintenance of large agricultural plots, reporting from disaster-struck areas and more.

It’s no wonder human beings have such an uneasy relationship with them. Another debatable side issue is the fact that some areas which have banned drones in order to protect the privacy and safety of citizens, still allow RC planes or helicopters. Clearer rules need to be set in place to resolve the matter.

Dutch National Police on eagle-training mission

In anticipation of the problems drones could pose in the future, the Dutch National Police have started training eagles to snatch drones out of the air. Birds of prey such as these are naturally adept at grabbing anything that flies clean out of their path of flight. Additionally, the raptors’ instinctive habit of taking their prize away from people and looking for a safe place in which to eat it, works out well for civilians.

People can at least feel assured that eagles won’t be dropping ‘dead’ drones on their heads. Of course, the Dutch police are not relying only on our feathered friends to capture rogue flying machines. They’re considering electronic solutions and nets too. In reply to whether a powerful drone’s blades can harm the birds, Guard From Above says it’s not likely to happen since their talons are tough.

India to use drones for tiger surveillance

India banned flying of drones some time ago. But the government is ready to take advantage of the surveillance capabilities of these unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), to protect the country’s wildlife. The National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) is waiting for the Ministry of Defense to wave the green flag on its 3.5 crore project to fight poaching, and resolve conflicts between humans and animals.

The initiative has also been cleared by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation and the Home Minister. The drones in question will be imported and forest department staff will be trained on how to control them. The machines will not be flown in or around forested areas inhabited by people.