Apple forced to pay $234 million over patent infringement suit

Apple has been ordered by a court in the US to pay as much as $234 million to the University of Wisconsin as compensation for a patent infringement. The company’s A7, A8 and A8X processors are in focus here, as it’s these very components that are the bane of the issue.

The infringement case was filed by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) back in 2014, and it’s now that the jury has reached the decision to make Apple pay $234 million in damages. Initially, the WARF had asked for $862 million in damages but had later lowered the request down to about $400 million.

As reported by Mac Rumors, a Reuters report has said that the court has found Apple not having willfully infringed on WARF’s patent, and this is what has brought the amount down to $234 million. The patent in question had been granted to WARF as far back as in 1998.

Apple Stock Photo

Dubbed, ‘Table based data speculation circuit for parallel processing computer,’ it applies to a method used for improving processor efficiency. The court has found the Cupertino-based company to be guilty of having infringed the patent through its iPhone 5s, iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPad Air 2 and iPad mini models.

Trouble doesn’t end here for Apple however, as even the A9 chipset inside the new iPhone 6S, the iPhone 6S Plus and the upcoming iPad Pro models houses the said technology. The WARF has been quick in recognizing this, and has already filed a second lawsuit.

Also Read: Apple gives 21.5-inch iMac a 4K display, all 27-inch models go 5K now

The iPhone-maker had managed to earn a daily profit of $134.7 million for the first six months of 2015. Give or take a few millions, the company will need to spend just 2 days’ worth of profit in order to clear this issue. Instead, it has decided to appeal the ruling.